Building Coins for March

Hey guys and dolls, how’s it going?
I’m back with another building pack!
After creating the Building Snowmen pack for January,
I really had no intention to create another version of it.
It turned out that my students liked it so much,
so I decided to create Building Hearts for February.
They asked if we could do these all the time,
and I know that as soon as I take down
their hearts from outside of the classroom, 
they’ll be asking for more!
I love these building packs, because they review so many of
the skills that my students need to practice!
We still have our letters where we can practice
our name and sight words, etc. 
Numbers are included so that students can practice
the order, and skip counting by 10’s as well. 
Students can also practice hearing the ending sounds
of a word, by way of word families. 
It also gives them a chance to practice their fine motor skills.
I will say, including a lot of fine motor practice
in my classroom has helped, because they have really been
doing an excellent job of cutting all of the pieces 
out themselves. 
Your students can put them together one of two ways.
You can just have the students to glue the pieces together,
or you can have them to glue each piece onto a little
strip of paper. 
Building Coins is an easy to prep activity that is great for St. Patrick's Day. It includes literacy and math practice for the primary classroom! This activity can be used for a craft, center activity, early finisher work, or as an alternative to morning work.
I’ve been think about different ways to implement this
in my classroom, and I love that it can be used
as a craft, center activity, early finisher activity
that a student can work on throughout the week,
or as an alternative to morning work. 
For more information, click here or 
on any picture!

Building Coins is an easy to prep activity that is great for St. Patrick's Day. It includes literacy and math practice for the primary classroom! This activity can be used for a craft, center activity, early finisher work, or as an alternative to morning work.

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